Self-Portrait Made Out of Q-tips

I’m currently in the process of applying to a digital design program, and as part of the lengthy application, I had to make a self-portrait. Not just any self-portrait, though. I had to make a self-portrait without using any standard art supplies. No painting, drawing, photography, clay, pastels, or any of that allowed!

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I’ve only ever done a self-portrait ONCE and that was pencil when I was 15. It’s been 13 years, in case you were wondering. In fact, until two weeks ago, I absolutely loathed the idea of self-portraits. (Those are for narcissists and lazy artists who can’t think of a good subject!)

I figured if I was going to do this, I might as well do something unique. I’ve admired portraits out of screws, QR codes, and crayons. Except that all those would have been more expensive and large scale than I was willing to deal with for this application. Plus, they’d all been done before.

So finally, I settled on… Q-tips! I chose to dye them with food products I consume to keep with the theme of avoiding art supplies and also to give it an extra personal touch.

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photo(21) What it took:
Over 2500 q-tips
Chocolate, chai concentrate, cinnamon, ginger, sangria, strawberries, tomato soup, and apple juice
Floral foam
Clear packing tape to hold the foam in place
Scissors
40 hours
Lots of patience

the story of wynwood walls

Here in South Florida, art is a pretty big deal. There’s a neighborhood in Miami, known as Wynwood-Edgewater, which has transformed into MIA’s major art district. (It’s actually two neighborhoods, sometimes collectively termed as Midtown.) It’s proof positive that art and business can exist harmoniously and that art, especially public art, can change a community.

HERE COMES THE NEIGHBORHOOD, a docuseries exploring the power of public art and innovation in communities, is basing it’s pilot season around the Arts District of Wynwood. Watch the video above for a great look into how one of Wynwood’s public art spaces came to be.

To learn more about the walls, visit the Wynwood Walls website.

*Reading this in e-mail and can’t see the video? Click here.

{hello there}

It’s been awhile, since I posted. {Hey, I warned you I’d be posting sporadically.} I thought I’d share some goodies from the web with you on this Monday. Feel free to share with me on the {bits of beauty} facebook page. Also, if you’re one of the few who have joined Google+ you can find me there, too. Enjoy!

Loving this:

“If you decide how you’re supposed to feel and you allow yourself to decide what things will make you feel that way, then the whole entire world can be yours.” from How to Have Everything You Want

The most delicious and useful website on the planet: Gojee

Gorgeous boho bride style, of which I will be stealing the hairstyle for the everyday.

Some delicious gluten-free recipes.

A lesson from the Dalai-Lama via Sarah Wilson.

Alaia thinks the pace of fashion is “inhuman”, and I happen to agree with him.

This popsicle maker can have a fresh treat ready in 7 minutes!

I’ve just discovered sophistimom and am loving the well-fed section!

This would be great to see in the classroom. Parents, suggest it to your teachers!

{Image SuperSwoon}

{pup portraits by studio legohead}

As much as I admire artworks by the greats, I’ve always felt that art in the home should be original, or at least unique and personal. Unless I had a special love for a particular famous piece of art work, I’d try to avoid hanging a poster of it in my home. Instead, I prefer something original, or closer to the original like a signed print from the artist; it feels like there is a stronger connection this way.

With that in mind, today I’m featuring these adorable drawings from studio legohead. How sweet are these? For around $120 you can get a personalized portrait of your pup to hang on your wall for all to admire. Now, isn’t that better than that cheap wine bottle print you got from a sidewalk stand?

{google art}

There’s nothing like seeing art in person, especially when carefully presented by well trained curators. However, Google has done a bang up job of bring art to the web with their new Google Art Project. As of today, you can virtually view works in 17 galleries including the MoMA, the Frick, the Tate, and Versailles. You can get closer than you’d ever be able to IRL, and in some cases in more detail than the naked eye would ever allow (as in see the crackling on the painting close.) Take some time today and explore the site or curate your own collection.

Did I mention that you can also take a google street view style tour through the Palace of Versailles?

The world we live in is truly awesome, isn’t it?